Who Gone? Analyzing the Hornets’ Trade Situation

According to this NOLA.com article and various other sources around the web (including Yahoo! Sports), the Hornets are actively attempting to trade one or more pieces of their bench to bolster other parts of the team. Hopefully, Byron Scott and Jeff Bower bring back some good value to complement one of the best starting 5 in the league. Meanwhile, here’s a look at the Hornets’ bench (backcourt) this season, their contracts, and the likelihood they’re still wearing teal come the trade deadline.

Bobby Jackson

Games

Minutes

FG%

3FG%

Personal Fouls

PPG

34

19.5

.350

.288

1.32

6.5

This is easily the worst shooting year of B-Jax’s career. Even though he hasn’t been able to top the 40% mark for the last three seasons, this year finds him floundering at just 35%. Even worse, his three point marksmanship (he shot 39% as recently as 2 years ago) seems to have vanished entirely. Shooting the three at 29% on a team which provides ample shooting opportunities won’t cut it for the rest of the season. The Hornets have a tough choice with Jackson, since he’s still very active on the court despite his awful shooting. He still pockets almost one full steal a game in just under 20 minutes of action, and he’s turned the ball over less than in his entire career.

Amount Owed/Season

Years

Trade Restrictions

$5,670,000

2

None

Given his age, and his contract, I don’t see many teams wanting him too badly. My gut feeling is that he will stay. Byron Scott, by all indications, still seems to be okay with his style of play. But when a guy is struggling to hit 35% of his shots, and is even worse from three, you never know.

Final Verdict: 35% likely to be traded

 

Jannero Pargo

 

Games

Minutes

FG%

3FG%

Personal Fouls

PPG

32 (4 starts)

16.1

.363

.255

1.50

6.3

If you thought B-Jax shooting 29% from long range was bad, have a sniff of Pargo’s 26% clip. Pargo, though, doesn’t take nearly as many bad threes as Jackson, and he’s shooting slightly better (but still awful). Recently, he’s gotten into the good graces of Byron Scott; instead of sulking after being benched for the Clippers game, he responded with his game of the season against Phoenix. That game alone should make Hornets’ brass think twice before bringing him up in trade talk.

Amount Owed/Season

Years

Trade Restrictions

$1,830,000

1

Player Consent Required

Pargo’s contract is a lot lighter than Jackson’s (1 year less, and about 10 million dollars less). However, since he’ll be an “Early Bird” free agent at the end of the year, he’ll have to agree to any deal the Hornets strike. I have no idea how open he would be to staying or leaving. But I really think that Hornets’ brass will overlook his poor shooting and see how the rest of his season plays out.

Final Verdict: 10% likely to be traded

 

Rasual Butler

 

Games

Minutes

FG%

3FG%

Personal Fouls

PPG

30 (5 starts)

21.1

.370

.347

1.73

6.0


Butler has shot the best percentage out of the Jackson-Pargo-himself trio. In fact, his three point shooting is almost 100 points better than Pargo’s and about 90 points better than Jackson’s. Additionally, he’s the only one of the three that can actually match up with larger shooting guards. This is also a guy who shot an absurd 46.3% from three for Miami in 03-04, so we know this recent shooting slump is definitely temporary. But as of right now, Rasual Butler is easily the most likely guy to be gone. Back to back DNP-Coach’s Decisions have a way of conveying that message.

Amount Owed/Season

Years

Trade Restrictions

$3,130,000

3

None

His contract does have 3 years left on it, but I’m more than willing to bet that several contenders would be willing to jump on him for the bargain 3 mil/year. His contract is longer than Jackson’s but far more tradeable, and is probably slightly less tradeable than Pargo’s (just looking financially). This also means that Butler won’t end up on teams looking for expiring contracts (eliminating front line guys like Stephen Hunter from possibly coming to the Bayou).

Final Verdict: 80% likely to be traded

 

Marcus Vinicius

 

Games

Minutes

FG%

3FG%

Personal Fouls

PPG

6

6.5

.300

.286

.00

2.0

Byron Scott said the recent play time for Marcus was due to a “roster shake up,” but you never know. It might as well have been some sort of try out for other teams; at 6’8” and 225, Vinicius could end up being very interesting for some teams as a project player were he thrown in an as part of a deal. We haven’t seen him much, but he’s shown he could possibly develop a consistent three point stroke. Mostly, it all comes back to his wingspan; even if he doesn’t develop much offensively, he has the tools to be a great defender.

Amount Owed/Season

Years

Trade Restrictions

$687,456

1

None

The contract obviously won’t be an issue for anyone here. In the end, I don’t think Vinicius is likely to be traded at all. But his recent playing time, especially if he ceases to get any following a possible trade, very well may have been an extended tryout.

Final Verdict: 5% likely to be traded

Julian Wright

 

Games

Minutes

FG%

3FG%

Personal Fouls

PPG

23

9.7

.457

.000

.52

2.1

Even though I’m willing to read back to back DNP-CD’s as a bad sign for Rasual Butler, I think it means no such thing for rookie Julian Wright. Simply put, this guy has way too much upside to be traded midseason for bench help. He hasn’t shown that he can knock down a jumper consistently at all, but hey, neither could Jordan in his early years (Disclaimer: I am not in any way attempting to say Wright will be a 100th of what Jordan was. So don’t yell at me.) But, fact is, he’s freakishly athletic, has a great wingspan, and had a reputation of a great work ethic (especially defensively) in college. In fact, I’m so positive he won’t be traded, I won’t even list his salary data here.

Final Verdict: 0% likely to be traded

And, well, that’s the backcourt for you. (I’m not even going to do Adam Haluska, since I know absolutely nothing about him). It really looks like the order of likelihood to be traded is this: Butler, Jackson, Pargo, Vinicius, Wright. One thing we need to remember about Jackson is that this exact moment is the last time that he will ever have any sort of trade value. Why do I say that? I think the primary view of him right now is that he’s an “energy” guy who “hustles” and “plays his heart out.” But if he shoots out the rest of the year at 30%, those descriptions will have been forgotten by every GM out there (they’re already forgetting them pretty fast.) I’m sure Hornets’ brass knows this.

As far as who we’re going to trade for, I’m not even going to try. Anyone have ideas as to that?

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5 Responses

  1. Dude, how could you compare Julian and Jordan!

    I like Bobby’s chances of being traded a little more than you. Especially if we are going for a guy with a 3-4 year contract.

  2. Hahah, you may well be right. I didn’t think many teams would want him when I wrote this post, but now that I think about it more, a few teams could use a back-up PG. But do you agree the window to deal him is rapidly closing?

  3. Actually, I don’t think so. He’s playing so badly, I can’t see someone trading for him. They’d trade for his contract.

    And he’s probably our best bench player. Excuse me while I go curl up and sob for a while

  4. And I thought Darrell Armstrong was bad… BJax is shooting 50 points (!!!!) worse than Armstrong did in his one full NO year.

  5. […] Who Gone? Analyzing the Hornets’ Trade Situation […]

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